Rabbit poisoning for the Jerrabomberra Wetlands

Young_wild_rabbit

TERRITORY and Municipal Services are warning that they’re about to start poisoning the rabbits on the eastern shores of Lake Burley Griffin.

“Rabbits will be controlled using carrots coated in the 1080 poison placed inside small cages, from late April. This method is widely used throughout Australia to control rabbit populations,” Senior Ranger, Jerrabomberra Wetlands, Michael Maconachie, said.

“The program commences with the distribution of un-poisoned feed to attract rabbits to specific areas. The 1080 poison will not be laid until after the school holidays.”

TAMS assures us the control program is essential for the wellbeing of native wildlife.

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3 Responses to “Rabbit poisoning for the Jerrabomberra Wetlands”

  1. Cienwen HIckey
    April 14, 2014 at 6:03 pm #

    No animals deserves to die such a terrible death as that which comes from 1080 poison. Blind Freddy would see that putting the bait in a cage will not stop rabbits pulling the carrots out leaving them for other herbivores. One has to ask what research TAMS has used to to justify this slaughter.
    Most marsupial and eutherian herbivores that have been tested exhibit a similar high sensitivity to 1080 poison. The main exceptions are marsupial herbivore species in Western Australia, which, because of their exposure to indigenous food plants containing fluoroacetate, have acquired a much greater tolerance to 1080. The most common signs of poisoning amongst herbivores are either hypersensitivity to stimuli or, more frequently, lethargy, respiratory distress and finally respiratory or cardiac failure. Some species experience convulsions, particularly just before death. Signs of poisoning amongst species tested during this study first appeared 1.0-39.4 h after dosing. Deaths followed 3-156 h after dosing. The overall susceptibility to 1080 of 25 species of herbivores is compared with that of the rabbit.
    (The Sensitivity of Australian Animals to 1080 Poison. Iii. Marsupial and Eutherian Herbivores. JC Mcilroy 1982).

  2. Maurene
    April 14, 2014 at 4:38 pm #

    A diabolical disgrace! The people involved in poisoning these innocent animals should be jailed and held responsible

  3. Bill
    April 14, 2014 at 1:21 pm #

    Having grown on up on a farm in northern NSW I am only too aware of the problems caused by rabbits. I used to trap them for pocket money. They were so bad and in such numbers, we used 1080 Rabbit Poison.. NEVER AGAIN! We kept our working dogs secure knowing the dangers, but even then we lost one of most loved sheep dogs. The fact is 1080 rabbit poison should NEVER be used in proximity to suburban areas. If someone’s dog or cat picks up a dead rabbit ( poisoned by 1080) the pet will die a cruel horrible death. I have seen this first hand and I will never forget it. Somehow part of a rabbit carcass was dropped ( by a crow or wedge-tailed eagle) in our yard within reach of one of our dogs.
    I urge TAMS to consider alternatives to 1080. It is too dangerous…it does not kill the intended victim quickly or painlessly.. I know its been used for decades and is very effective – but it is indiscriminate. Kangaroos and other native animals, birds, pets are all at risk.

    Please DO NOT USE 1080 rabbit poison.

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