Digging into the numbers. What the crime statistics say about Canberra’s neighbourhoods

Share Canberra's trusted news:

4754231502_940e0fe7f1_z

WITH the third quarter crime statistics available to play with we dug in a little bit to see which parts of Canberra skew towards which crimes.

In alphabetical order here they are.

Belconnen

Belco scored highly for traffic offences, sexual assault, “other offences”, and robbery.


Gungahlin

Gungahlin is a somewhat surprising outlier for “Offences against a person” which covers kidnapping as well as threats and harassment.


North Canberra

The Inner North is a bit of a crime hot spot which playing host to the Civic nightlife undoubtedly contributes to.

Leading categories included assault, sexual assault, burglary, “other offences”, and robbery.


Tuggeranong

While not boasting the North’s vibrant nightlife Tuggers still manages to stand out for property damage, motor vehicle theft, and theft.


Pleasingly there were no homicides in the last quarter despite considerable provocation.

[Photo by Connor Tarter, attribution licence,

Who Can You Trust?

In a world beleaguered by spin and confused messages, there's never been more need for diverse, trustworthy, independent journalism in Canberra.

Who can you trust? Well, for more than 25 years, "CityNews" has proudly been an independent, free, family-owned news magazine, serving the national capital with quality, integrity and authority. Through our weekly magazine and daily through our digital platforms, we constantly and reliably deliver high-quality and diverse opinion, news, arts, socials and lifestyle columns.

If you trust our work online and believe in the power of independent voices, I encourage you to make a small contribution.

Every dollar of support will be invested back into our journalism so we can continue to provide a valuably different view of what's happening around you and keep citynews.com.au free.

Click here to make your donation and you will be supporting the future of journalism and media diversity in the ACT.

Thank you,

Ian Meikle, editor

Previous articleArts / ‘Meaty’ new Russian film festival
Next article“Crisis 1914!” at the Museum of Australian Democracy

Leave a Reply