CSIRO heralds more Australian prawns for Christmas

Share Canberra's trusted news:
Dr Melony Sellars, Genics CEO .

THERE will be more Australian-grown prawns this Christmas, helped by a new prawn health check, says the CSIRO.

The new test uses CSIRO’s “Shrimp MultiPath” technology, commercialised by Brisbane start-up company Genics, which was spun-out of CSIRO to tackle the global challenge of food security and quality.

It comes as the domestic prawn farming industry recovers from losses from pathogens over the last three years.

The technology can detect 13 commercially significant prawn diseases, including white spot syndrome, which wiped out many prawn populations in 2016, and Infectious Hypodermal and Haematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHHNV).

Improved management of IHHNV using Shrimp MultiPath technology increased production by 3.7 tonnes per hectare, or $67,000 farm gate value. Consequently, a 50-hectare Australian prawn farm could see its revenues increase by more than $3 million a season.

Prawn farms are located across northern NSW and in Queensland with around 750 hectares of prawn ponds. An increase of 3.7 tonnes a hectare could boost the yield of farmed prawns by around 50 per cent.

CSIRO chief executive Dr Larry Marshall says: “It’s great to see CSIRO science being accelerated out of the lab and into a start-up that could tackle our global food security challenge, a very clear public benefit – while also giving Aussies more prawns to enjoy with family and friends.

“Australian seafood is globally prized, so innovation that protects our biosecurity and boosts our domestic economy is a great example of science creating new opportunities.”

Genics CEO and former CSIRO scientist Dr Melony Sellars says the technology comes at an opportune time for the domestic prawn farming industry after losses from pathogens over the last three years.

“Australia already has some of the best prawns you can buy. However, the good news for Australian consumers ahead of Christmas is that we’re helping to grow more prawns, and make them even better,” Dr Sellars says.

“Our tests quickly help prawn farmers make informed management decisions, and for consumers this means more, high-quality, locally grown Australian prawns.”

 

 

Who Can You Trust?

In a world beleaguered by spin and confused messages, there's never been more need for diverse, trustworthy, independent journalism in Canberra.

Who can you trust? Well, for more than 25 years, "CityNews" has proudly been an independent, free, family-owned news magazine, serving the national capital with quality, integrity and authority. Through our weekly magazine and daily through our digital platforms, we constantly and reliably deliver high-quality and diverse opinion, news, arts, socials and lifestyle columns.

If you trust our work online and believe in the power of independent voices, I encourage you to make a small contribution.

Every dollar of support will be invested back into our journalism so we can continue to provide a valuably different view of what's happening around you and keep citynews.com.au free.

Click here to make your donation and you will be supporting the future of journalism and media diversity in the ACT.

Thank you,

Ian Meikle, editor

Previous articleFive secretaries go in public service restructure
Next articleBus usage drops in three Canberra regions

Leave a Reply