$8 million boost brings top cancer researcher to Canberra

Share Canberra's trusted news:
Dr Marian Burr… “Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionising the treatment of many cancers and is leading to dramatic improvements in survival.”

FUNDING of $8 million, over eight years, has brought one of the world’s most promising early-career cancer researchers to Canberra to further studies on cancer immunotherapy research. 

Dr Marian Burr, who is “leading research” in the cancer immunotherapy field, according to ANU vice-chancellor Prof Brian Schmidt, will continue her research at ANU’s John Curtin School of Medical Research as part of a fellowship from the Snow Medical Research Foundation (Snow Medical).

The money will support Dr Burr to expand on her research, which looks into how the human immune system can hunt down and eradicate cancer.

“The Snow Fellowship provides a tremendous opportunity for me to focus on unlocking the power of cancer immunotherapy—an emerging treatment which uses the power of a patient’s immune system to help hunt down and destroy cancer,” Dr Burr says.

“Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionising the treatment of many cancers and is leading to dramatic improvements in survival.”

Dr Burr will use her fellowship to build on her current research examining “immune checkpoint inhibitors”—or ICI. This therapy activates T cells in the patient’s own immune system to find and eliminate cancer.

“It’s like shining a spotlight on the cancer cells which the T cells then see and target. ICI therapy can lead to long-term complete remission, even in patients with very advanced cancers,” Dr Burr says.

“What is so exciting is the incredible potential immunotherapy has to wipe out cancer that has spread to different parts of the body. And for some cancers that’s a complete game-changer.

“Using cutting-edge technologies, my team will build on our recent discoveries to enhance immune targeting of aggressive cancers—such as lung cancer, melanoma and leukaemia, and to better understand the mechanisms cancer cells use to hide or shield themselves from the immune system.”

Prof Schmidt congratulated Terry Snow for bringing one of the world’s most promising early-career cancer researchers to ANU and Canberra—an outcome that he says will not only benefit Australia but the world.

“Cancer is a killer, and it has been a terrible killer for many years. But in Marian, cancer has a formidable enemy, and the work she will undertake as part of this research program will give hope to many both now and in the future,” he says.

Who Can You Trust?

In a world beleaguered by spin and confused messages, there's never been more need for diverse, trustworthy, independent journalism in Canberra.

Who can you trust? Well, for more than 25 years, "CityNews" has proudly been an independent, free, family-owned news magazine, serving the national capital with quality, integrity and authority. Through our weekly magazine and daily through our digital platforms, we constantly and reliably deliver high-quality and diverse opinion, news, arts, socials and lifestyle columns.

If you trust our work online and believe in the power of independent voices, I encourage you to make a small contribution.

Every dollar of support will be invested back into our journalism so we can continue to provide a valuably different view of what's happening around you and keep citynews.com.au free.

Click here to make your donation and you will be supporting the future of journalism and media diversity in the ACT.

Thank you,

Ian Meikle, editor

Previous articleYoung UC moves up in international rankings
Next articleCoronavirus money problems: What you need to know

Leave a Reply