Independent businesses can now repair Apple products

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Minister for Consumer Affairs, Shane Rattenbury… “This is an improvement on the previous situation, where consumers were locked out of repairing their products because manufacturers don’t allow third parties to repair them.”

A NEW program to Australia will make it easier for consumers to repair Apple products after the manufacturer gave independent businesses the green light to access specialty parts and conduct the repairs. 

In the past, the popular technology manufacturer has been notorious for making it difficult for third-party repairers to work on their products, however, changes to the Apple Repair Provider Program now allows businesses in Australia to access genuine Apple parts and training. 

Consumer Affairs Minister Shane Rattenbury believes the program is a positive move for both consumers and small and local businesses.  

“This is an improvement on the previous situation, where consumers were locked out of repairing their products because manufacturers don’t allow third parties to repair them,” Mr Rattenbury says.  

“The ability for local businesses to get access to parts directly from the manufacturer is a win for the ‘right to repair’ movement and the ACT’s goals for sustainability. This will allow these small businesses to begin to break into a market previously dominated by bigger companies and provide greater consumer choice.”

While Mr Rattenbury hails the move as a good first step, he warns that it is still an Apple-controlled “repair regime” and is not aware of what limitations may be placed on the third-party repairers.

“My hope is that a detailed examination by the Productivity Commission will allow the ‘right to repair’ concept to be imported into the Australian context, resulting in reforms that benefit Australian consumers and local businesses, while supporting better sustainability,” Mr Rattenbury says.

“Australians are among the highest users of technology products, generating around 25 kilograms of e-waste per capita each year, so I hope that this move will help Australians repair the goods they have, rather than constantly needing to buy new items.”

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