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Canberra Today 8°/12° | Wednesday, October 20, 2021 | Digital Edition | Crossword & Sudoku

New wasp strategy goes for the queens

The European wasp… their nests are often hidden with the most common nesting sites in wall cavities, holes in the ground, roof voids, retaining walls and in conifer trees.

A NEW European wasp (eWasp) trapping program is being trialled in the ACT to help lower the number of eWasp queens before they can establish new nests.

Specialised eWasp queen bait stations have been placed in various locations across Canberra including Molonglo River, Giralang Pond, Kingston Foreshore, Weston Park, Franklin Pond and Yarralumla Creek.

“With spring upon us, eWasp queens are coming out of hibernation in search of carbohydrates and a suitable site to establish nests,” CoreEnviro Solutions senior pest and weed officer Jim Bariesheff said.

“One eWasp queen can produce thousands of workers and hundreds of next-generation queens in a colony over several months. Their nests are often hidden with the most common nesting sites in wall cavities, holes in the ground, roof voids, retaining walls and in conifer trees.

“The new product, Vespex from Sundew, is a chemical-free carbohydrate that lures the eWasps to the station where the queens become trapped in the product and removed from the environment.”

Mr Bariesheff said eWasp nests and bee swarms could be reported to the eWasp hotline.

“Canberrans have done a fantastic job with reporting eWasp nests with 1111 reported to the hotline over the past year,” he said.

“Since September 2021, members of the community have also helped identify 11 cases of bee swarms to the eWasp hotline in areas on residential land, footpaths, nature strips and in parks.

“If stung by a wasp or bee, a cold pack may be used to relieve the pain. If there is evidence of a more severe reaction or the stung individual is known to be allergic to wasp and bee stings, medical attention should be sought immediately.”

Report eWasps or bees to 6258 5551, download the eWasp app or contact the eWasp hotline via the website ewasp.com.au,  which also has the capability of receiving any images of nests or hives to assist when reporting.

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