In this sponsored post, “CityNews” speaks to a variety of services that specialise in and are passionate about empowering Canberrans during their later lives. 

OSCAR Wilde once famously said: “With age comes wisdom.”

If the poet’s words are anything to go by, Canberra must be a wise city with the last census showing that residents over the age of 55 make up about a quarter of the territory’s total population.

It’s therefore fitting that there are a variety of services and businesses across the ACT that specialise in and are passionate about empowering Canberrans during their later lives. 

Supplies that make daily living easier

CAPITAL Rehabilitation Supplies aims to provide comfortable living for seniors by providing them with the right equipment to make their day-to-day life easier, says manager and owner Tim Robinson.

Capital Rehabilitation Supplies, a family-owned business with more than 40 years’ experience in the industry, stocks electric lift chairs, height-adjustable chairs, pressure care cushions and mattresses, electric hospital beds and home care beds, mobility aids such as walkers, wheelchairs, rollators, crutches and walking sticks.

“We know that some of these issues are sensitive and can be uncomfortable to deal with, so we try to be as delicate and helpful as possible,” says Tim.

“We pride ourselves on our patience and helpful attitude. People can come discuss what they require with us and we can find what works for them.” 

Tim says everyone has their own needs and that Capital Rehabilitation Supplies can help make day-to-day life easier by finding the right equipment to suit the individual.

“If we do not stock a certain item we will always do everything in our power to locate the product,” he says.

“We offer quality, caring advice that comes with a smile.”

Capital Rehabilitation Supplies, 3/66 Heffernan Street, Mitchell. Call 6174 4813 or visit capitalrehabilitationsupplies.com.au

Spacious, designer villas are selling fast

PERFECT for retirement, Summerfield’s final 13 spacious, designer villas in Braidwood are soon to be sold, says sales director Jane Mackenzie-Ross.

“Summerfield is a boutique, over 55s estate of only 56 homes,” she says.

“Forty-three of those are built and the final 13 are now on sale and planned to be completed by mid 2022. 

“If anyone has been thinking of securing one, now is the time to move whilst there are still some available.”

Located an hour from Canberra, three from Sydney, and 45 minutes from the coast, Jane says Summerfield is in a fantastic location that’s perfect for people aged 55 and over.

“Summerfield offers luxury, yet affordable three bedroom, two bathroom, two car villas, with stunning views of the surrounding heritage-listed region,” she says. 

“There are heaps of activities and facilities for residents to enjoy nearby, including a club house, heated pool, garden, arts and crafts, and of course the many restaurants and cafes throughout historic Braidwood – perfect for foodies.”

And, Jane says that anyone who buys one of the remaining 13 villas will receive a stunning addition to their purchase.

“For everyone who purchases a villa from now until June 30, we are helping them celebrate with a seven day holiday for two,” she says.

“This will be in Hervey Bay and includes a $1500 food and drinks voucher.”

Summerfield, 70 Little River Road, Braidwood. Visit summerfield.com.au or call Jane on 0400 472577.

Renovating for better accessibility 

BORDEAUX Construction and Management is a “one-stop-shop”, guiding renovation projects through the design process to the end of its construction, says project manager Michael Milutinovic.

This makes the process easier for clients, including seniors, according to Michael, who says the family-run, Queanbeyan-based business can do it all when it comes to renovations, such as renovate the kitchen, adjoin a new master bedroom or ensuite, or even attach a sunroom. 

“We’re not waiting on anyone and we can guide them through the finishes,” he says. 

“We work with some interior designers to guide them through the colour and finishing selection, too.” 

The business even has in-house joiners that can provide renovators with custom joinery solutions for their walk-in robes, ensuites and vanities, says Michael.

Often, Michael says clients like where they’re living and they like their suburb but they want to improve their home. Meanwhile, some seniors might want to make adjustments to their house to make it more accessible.

“They don’t want to move but they want to maximise their quality of life at home as well as add a bit of value to their home while doing so,” says Michael who holds an unrestricted “A”-class builder’s licence in the ACT and is licensed in NSW. 

With more than 14 years’ experience in the construction industry in Canberra and Sydney, Michael says the business doesn’t shy away from complexity.

“We do everything from extensions, full home renovations and new builds,” he says. 

“We can really look at any type of construction. We have experience across the board.” 

Bordeaux Construction and Management, 8 Aurora Place, Queanbeyan. Call 6299 4642 or visit bordeauxbcm.com.au

Building confidence through exercise

EVEN as it becomes more difficult with age, Arthritis ACT CEO Rebecca Davey says it’s important to remain active and to condition muscles that protect against injury.

Arthritis ACT CEO Rebecca Davey.

While the recommended 30 minutes of exercise each day is a good start, Rebecca says it’s also important to build strength in different areas of the body.

“The reason we want to do that is, as we get older, our balance tends to go if we haven’t remained very active,” she says.

“Even people who go for a walk every day, or say they are always doing different things, they’re not exercising all their body.”

As a result, Rebecca says Arthritis ACT offers a full range of exercise classes that are tailored to different age groups, such as hydrotherapy and tai chi.

“We have strength and balance classes all over Canberra, which really look at building up bone strength and making people more stable on their feet,” she says.

“And we can also work with people to devise an independent exercise plan.”

As people get older, they become less sure on their feet and can lack self-assuredness, Rebecca says.

“Having that confidence to get out again, to come join a group or come and see someone who can help them get more fit is a huge barrier,” she says.

“We work really hard to welcome people in and always look at the friendships that people will make around our exercise classes to reduce that barrier and to entice them to come back.”

Arthritis ACT, building 1, Colette Place, Pearce, and building 18, 170 Haydon Drive, Bruce. Call 1800 011041, email info@arthritisact.org.au or visit arthritisact.org.au

The importance of an up-to-date will 

CAPON and Hubert Lawyers and Mediators can help clients update their will as they get older to ensure their wishes are respected, says wills and estate planning lawyer Ashilpa Khanna.

Lawyer Ashilpa Khanna of Capon & Hubert Lawyers & Mediators.

Unfortunately, Ashilpa says some people don’t have a will, which means their possessions are instead distributed by the “rules of intestacy”.

“This distribution means that someone – your spouse or a family member – will have to apply to the court to be appointed administrator before they can handle your estate,” she says. 

This can be costly and time-consuming, she says. 

For seniors, even if they have a will, Ashilpa says it’s important to periodically review it, especially after significant events such as when children get married to their partners or the birth of a grandchild. 

“At the forefront of people’s minds is making sure their financial and legal affairs are in order, so that in the event of a crisis, their loved ones are secure and can be provided for as intended,” she says. 

Capon and Hubert Lawyers and Mediators has been helping people with their legal matters for more than 34 years and can also help seniors with a range of legal issues in areas such as family law, children’s matters, conveyancing, and power of attorney.

“We are focused on giving honest and expert advice at all times,” she says.

“Our staff are experienced in their fields and we take pride in knowing that they will always use common sense, respect, courtesy and good judgement when dealing with clients.”

Capon and Hubert Lawyers and Mediators, first floor, 32-38 Townshend Street, Phillip. Email enquiries@chsol.com.au, call 6152 9203 or visit chsol.com.au

The Parkinson’s ACT singing group, the Bushlarks, perform at a recent event.

Finding support in groups and services 

FOR more than 35 years, Parkinson’s ACT has supported people with Parkinson’s disease but there are still many families and carers in need of help, says president John Sheldrick.  

Parkinson’s is a degenerative neurological disease that has no known cure, says John.

However, he says people with the disease can find support in the not-for-profit’s eight support groups as well as their educational services.

“Our support groups offer great fellowship and sharing as well as therapeutic support,” he says.

“They include singing, painting and dancing groups, as well as discussion groups.

“We especially support a very senior occupational therapist who has worked wonders for some of our people and who regularly conducts informative seminars on a wide range of subjects applicable to those with Parkinson’s and those associated with them.”

One of the discussion groups is also based in Bungendore, with assistance available to people who are dealing with the NDIS or are part of the My Aged Care program, says John. 

“If you have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s, or are a carer, please consider becoming a member,” he says. 

Parkinson’s ACT, Pearce Community Centre, 7 Collett Place, Pearce. Call 1800 644189, visit parkinsonsact.org.au or email actparkinsons@gmail.com

Hearing help that ‘changes lives’

GETTING help with hearing loss is all about improving communication and gaining clarity, says Dr Vass Hearing Clinic principal Dr William Vass.  

Principal Dr William Vass

With many years of experience in the hearing industry, he says that while people think nothing of having an eye test or wearing glasses to correct their vision, the idea of having a hearing test and facing up to hearing issues is still not comfortably accepted. 

“Hearing loss is identified as an elderly person’s issue and it is associated negatively with ageing,” Dr Vass says.

“That’s not necessarily true. Generally, people don’t want to admit they need hearing help. 

“I say to patients: ‘I wear glasses to improve my eyesight, it doesn’t mean I am blind!’

“Wearing hearing aids doesn’t mean the person is deaf, it means you are seeking better clarity and improved communication.” 

Dr Vass says patients have the certainty that they’ll be seeing him when they visit the clinic and that he will provide one-on-one, tailored care and advice.

The best part of Dr Vass’ job is seeing how his patients’ lives can be turned around once they make the step to get their hearing tested. 

“My patients can be depressed, isolated and angry. Hearing loss can result in communication breakdown and when they finally receive appropriate care, they are more outgoing and confident,” he says. 

Dr Vass Hearing Clinic, suite 14, John James Medical Centre, 175 Strickland Crescent, Deakin. Visit drvasshearing.com.au or call 6282 2717.

Supporting people to age in their home 

THE Salvation Army expanded its home care services to Canberra last year where, under Community Care ACT, it helps older people live independently in their own homes. 

Community Care ACT general manager Fiona Sanders.

Offering a range of services such as domestic assistance, clinical care and social support, general manager Fiona Sanders says what she loves most about Community Care ACT is that they support people to age in a familiar environment and feel like they’ve still got control over how they live their life.

“I think that’s the most important thing about us being able to deliver services to people in their homes,” she says. 

“Keeping them at home and enabling them to make decisions about how they want to live their life, like making the call on when they want to shower or when they want to shop.” 

Accessing home care funding can be a daunting process for most, which is why the team there also offers obligation free assistance in navigating through the aged care system, she says. 

“We can try to help speed up the process by finding out what funding you’re eligible for and help you go through that process,” Fiona says. 

“Basically, we’ll help you navigate through the fog and do everything we can so you can receive the services that you want at home.” 

But Fiona recommends not leaving it too long to ask for help, saying it can take time to go through the process to be eligible for home support.

“It’s better to start the conversation early and go through the process, before the need arises,” she says. 

The Salvation Army, Community Care ACT. Call 1300 111227 or visit agedcare.salvos.org.au

The many benefits of moving 

AN active lifestyle has many physical and mental benefits and is particularly important for seniors, according to Orthopaedics ACT’s orthopaedic surgeon Dr Nicholas Tsai, who specialises in the areas of spine, hip, knee and trauma. 

Orthopaedics ACT’s orthopaedic surgeon Dr Nicholas Tsai.

“Activity promotes cardiovascular fitness and social interactions; it elevates the mood and also helps to prevent osteoporosis due to inactivity and lack of sun exposure,” he says. 

“All joints benefit from moderate daily movements, whether the exercises are land-based or in water. Walking aids are also important for pain relief if you have arthritis in the lower limbs.” 

Back pain is very common too, particularly as we grow older, Dr Tsai says. 

“Most people require regular stretches and can take up tai chi, yoga or Pilates to strengthen the muscles,” he says.

Dr Tsai says the red flags for back pain, which may require a medical consultation, are numbness or tingling in the legs, sciatica (pain shooting down the legs), sudden onset of severe pain, which does not improve, associated with bowel or urinary changes, or any weakness in the legs.

Orthopaedics ACT strives to provide the best advice to all members of the senior community, says Dr Tsai. 

“Patients will be assessed by experienced orthopaedic surgeons, and in most cases a conservative management plan will be provided,” he says. 

“The goal is always to improve the condition and to return to an active lifestyle as soon as possible.” 

Dr Tsai says patients with mild symptoms will be referred to a physiotherapist participating in the GLA:D exercise program, which helps people with hip and knee osteoarthritis manage their symptoms.

Orthopaedics ACT also offers joint replacement information sessions for those who have to undergo joint replacement surgery.

“Surgical intervention is offered as the last resort, usually after conservative management has not been successful or if the condition is deemed so severe that conservative treatment is unlikely to improve it,” he says.

Orthopaedics ACT, Woden Specialist Medical Centre, level 2, 90 Corinna Street, Phillip. Call 6221 9320 or visit orthoact.com.au

Your Property Profits owners Kim Persson, left, and Sophie McLean.

Helping home sellers break records 

HELPING people – including seniors – with every aspect of property renovations, Your Property Profits takes on all the hard work, says co-owner Kim Persson.

“We can help seniors with all aspects of a renovation with our team of tradespeople, stylists, real estate experts, photographers and more,” she says.

“Clients can sit back while we focus on getting the best results possible for their property.”

And clients don’t need to worry about any up-front cost, as the renovating team front the cost of clients who then pay after the property has sold, she says. 

“We work to budget and timeframe, whether it’s minor repairs or major renovations, all costs are pushed back to settlement,” says Kim.

Some renovations they’ve completed are worth about $300,000, others are less, some properties need a fresh, modern remodel, others an extension, and some may not need anything at all, she says. 

“No matter what it is, we have the expertise to enhance the property in the right way, to get the most value for the client,” she says. 

And for anyone thinking of selling, she says now’s a great time. 

“The current Canberra market is very advantageous for sellers and we are seeing suburb sales records broken,” she says.

“We have been privileged to have helped some of our customers break some of these suburb record sales, which is so exciting.”

Your Property Profits. Call Kim and Sophie on 1800 225597, email hello@yourpropertyprofits.com.au or visit yourpropertyprofits.com.au 

The Aerie.

Independent living with a view

LOCATED in a desired suburb only 9km from the CBD, The Aerie at Narrabundah offers people aged over 55 independent living options with great views, says Lendlease sales manager Rob Rowe.

“The location offers great views of the Kowen ranges and a golf course and is close to Manuka Village and the Red Hill shops,” he says.

“Once completed in mid-2022 it will contain 92 independent two bedroom to three bedroom living units with a range of floor plans to suit a variety of lifestyles, needs and budgets.

“The architecturally designed homes feature open-plan layouts with quality finishes including Miele appliances and stone benchtops.

“The completed clubhouse offers a social hub for activities and there is an indoor heated pool, exercise room, lounge, hairdressing salon, library and more.”

Selling at prices from $720,000 to $1.19 million, more than half of the units have been sold or reserved, but The Aerie will release its final stage in mid-2021, Rob says. 

For full terms and conditions on contract types or more information on The Aerie contact Rob on 0438 254043.

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