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Canberra Today 8°/10° | Monday, July 4, 2022 | Digital Edition | Crossword & Sudoku

Crab burger gets the thumbs up

The soft-shell crab burger… a generous serve and stuffed in a milk bun with coleslaw and tartar. Photo: Wendy Johnson

Dining reviewer WENDY JOHNSON pops into a casual dining spot that features a clean, bright interior, with Scandinavian-inspired design influences.

IN 2016, Rye Café and Bar arrived in Braddon with a refreshingly different food offering, primarily gorgeous looking, open Danish sandwiches. 

Wendy Johnson.

Fast forward to 2022 and a new location is in full swing at South Point Tuggeranong, with a prime position on the busy Anketell Street food precinct.

Rye Café offers sweet and savoury dishes, specialty coffee, pressed juices and smoothies. You can grab-and-go or settle and relax. 

This casual dining spot features a clean, bright interior, with Scandinavian-inspired design influences. A feature is the massive pink coffee machine and accompanying pink grinders, which all face the street front drawing major attention.

Another feature is the large display of desserts and small savoury items. I asked about the open Danish sandwiches, which I loved on my visit to Braddon, but only one was left. I was told they’re made fresh daily, but the Tuggeranong operation doesn’t carry a large range.

Instead, at lunch, burgers, croquettes and a hot dog are on the main menu. Toasties are on a specials board.

My choice was the soft-shell crab burger ($23), which arrived on a simple but attractive wooden board with a small selection of fries on the side. 

The deep-fried crab was a generous serve and stuffed in a milk bun with coleslaw and tartar. It looked amazing but was big and I wondered how to manage it. In the end I deconstructed it, which seemed easier. The crab was fantastic, the tartar tasty and the bun super soft. The fries were disappointingly lukewarm (at best). 

Pulled beef toastie… the tender pulled beef came with braised onion, capsicum, Swiss cheese and a creamy herb aioli. Photo: Wendy Johnson

The toastie line-up is intriguing and, on our visit, included a smoked salmon and cream cheese, a roasted pumpkin and avo, an eggplant and zucchini, and a pulled beef (all $14).

My friend ordered the pulled beef (fries, also lukewarm, were $4), which was pretty darn delicious and a lovely size for a lighter lunch. The tender pulled beef came with braised onion, capsicum, Swiss cheese and a creamy herb aioli. It went down the hatch just fine. The all-time-fave ham, cheese and tomato toastie is also on the menu for $10.

Other lunch options included beef cheek croquettes with fried egg, braised cabbage and celeriac fritters ($22). The crispy pork burger was $24, and the Copenhagen Street Dog ($19) comes with chilli jam, mustard, remoulade, braised cabbage and pickled cucumber.

Coffee is by Five Senses and Three Mills provides the bread (gluten free available with any meal for a $2 surcharge) and delectable desserts.

Rye Café South Point has a large enclosed outdoor area. Ceiling heaters help in colder weather. The service was friendly but slow (post ordering). The café is happy to handle dietary requirements.

 

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Wendy Johnson

Wendy Johnson

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