The Greek crepe… stuffed with salty feta, baby spinach, black olives and fresh chives. Photo: Wendy Johnson.

"The possibilities with these thin pancakes are endless and it’s no wonder they’re popular in so many parts of the world,” writes dining reviewer WENDY JOHNSON.

Wendy Johnson.

SWEET or savoury? That was the question when out for breakfast at Crepe Stop in Braddon, which opened in the Yamaroshi development on Mort St about a year ago.

We opted for savoury. Both crepes were delicious and filled with tasty ingredients – not overloaded but certainly not skimpy. The possibilities with these thin pancakes are endless and it’s no wonder they’re popular in so many parts of the world.

The Greek crepe ($13) celebrated the flavours we all know and love about this country. The crepe was stuffed with salty feta, baby spinach, black olives and fresh chives. The dish included tomatoes but they were pale pink, hard and had no flavour so I set them aside. I was a bit baffled because tomatoes are in season and it’s so easy to source bright red, juicy ones, loaded with goodness.

Other savoury options include the Aussie ($15), and varieties named after cities like Melbourne, Hobart, Brisbane and Sydney (poor Canberra isn’t on the list). The Americano is a crepe modelled after a beef burger ($13).

The Mexicano crepe… with spicy pepperoni and Mexican sauce. Photo: Wendy Johnson.

My friend opted for the Mexicano ($17), created with spicy pepperoni and Mexican sauce. The cheese was tasty, the jalapenos added bite and the capsicum offered a veggie hit.

On the sweet side, the Crepe Stop offers several styles with decadent Nutella, including the Sphinx with cream and ice cream ($11) and the Pyramids with bananas, strawberries, coconut and whipped cream ($12).

Non-Nutella nuts might prefer the Tut ($8) with cinnamon or lemon, sugar and whipped cream or the Ramses ($10) with maple syrup or jam and ice cream. Pancakes ($12 to $16) and waffles ($12 to $14) are also available.

Crepe Stop uses a touchless coffee technology system called TopBrewer, which promises to deliver “wow-factor” moments but falls short in Wendy's view. Photo: Wendy Johnson.

We were going to stay to share a sweet crepe but were disappointed with the coffee, so much so we didn’t drink it but headed out to buy takeaway at a well-known coffee spot down the street. Crepe Stop uses a system called TopBrewer, which promises to deliver “wow-factor” moments but falls short in our view. It’s a touchless coffee technology system, so no barista is required, but we are too serious about our weekend caffeine hit to accept less than the best. 

After our takeaway it was time to bop about Braddon. We headed to the (relatively) new Village Markets at Haig Park, held every Sunday 8am to 2pm. The markets are well worth the visit and it’s super to buy local and regional produce.

Then we settled in with friends who were dining at one of their fave spots, Rizla, for lunch. We indulged in a glass of stunning Whistle and Hope Riesling 2019, which winemaker Matt Bilby in Wangaratta, Victoria, accurately describes as “Unforced. Elegant. Pure”. So true.

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Ian Meikle, editor